Month: November 2016

Ep 09: Empty homes and empty promises

Vancouver has introduced its empty home tax, but is it a solution in search of a problem? Former Bank of Canada Governor David Dodge thinks it’s a supply problem and BC NDP leader thinks dumping cash into co-op housing is the solution. Meanwhile, the Trudeau Government seems to be continuing to find ways to walk back from its electoral reform promises, with vague statements by Minister Maryam Monsef and leaked consultation questions. But the federal NDP are signalling they may compromise with the Conservatives. Scott and Ian also take a closer look at what the US Presidential Election might mean for Canada and whether Alberta is headed down a dark path. Finally, the Liberals are repealing the anal sex provision of the Criminal Code and Mulcair is voted Parliamentarian of the Year.

As always, Ian and Scott break down what’s happening in BC and across the country. Subscribe, leave a review and follow us on Facebook and Twitter.

Intro music from Abett on Freesound.org

Ep 07: The Darkest Timeline

Scott and Ian share their thoughts on the recent US Election and the implications for BC and Canada. Warning there is a lot of swearing.

Michael Chong’s Campaign Stop in Vancouver

chongmichael_cpc

CPC Leadership Candidate Michael Chong

This past Friday I attended a meet and greet for Conservative Party leadership candidate Michael Chong, hosted by the Vancouver-Centre EDA.

As listeners to the podcast know Michael Chong has piqued my interest by breaking with some of the more orthodox big “C” Conservative positions on climate change, carbon pricing and advocacy for major democratic reforms in how Parliament functions.

I recorded the speech and following Q&A segment. Apologies  for the poor sound quality. The event was held in a loud bar with bad acoustics and I recorded on my phone.

I asked Michael Chong the question I had brought up in episode 6 on the short term fiscal impact of his carbon tax plan. His plan calls for $18 billion in tax cuts to offset the new carbon tax. The tax cuts take effect in 2020 but the carbon tax gets phased in over 10 years. I wanted to know how he reconciled that with his pledge to keep a balanced budget. Unfortunately the audio is unusable from when I spoke with him after the Q&A had finished. He answered that yes there would be some short term fiscal stress but it was both manageable and there would be a stimulus effect from such a massive tax cut. Their internal models show up to $7 billion in additional federal revenue from such a stimulus but this was left out of the policy paper in order to be conservative about the fiscal situation.

Please give these a listen, there were a lot of interesting questions asked from his stance on LGBTQ issues, to ISIS to free movement between Australia, New Zealand and Canada.

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